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This Page Updated
21st October 2016

 

TAKAHASHI Refractors
With a Strehl Ratio of 0.998, a Very High Contrast Transfer Coefficient and Perfect Colour Correction, TAKAHASHI Refractors have no rivals!

The superior visual and photographic performance of TAKAHASHI FS-60CB, FC-76, FSQ-85, FSQ-106, TSA-102, TSA-120, TOA-130, and TOA-150 refractors proves that when it comes to deep-sky astro-photography :
High optical quality is far more important than aperture!

With a
Strehl Ratio between 0.992 and 0.998, Takahashi refractors produce razor-sharp views of all astronomical objects. And, when it comes to astro-photography, they have no rivals. The FSQ Series of refractors/astrographs have become a living legend! In fact, even the little FS-60CB gives visual/photographic results, which are in many ways superior to those obtained with other brands of refractors (or reflectors) of similar and much larger aperture!

But donít just take my word for it, look to the images on this page to see a spectacular demonstration of the astro-
photographic images that are possible with a TAKAHASHI refractor.

ADVICE TO PROSPECTIVE CUSTOMERS

A close examination of the performance of most TAKAHASHI refractors clearly shows they are equally suited to both visual observation and astro-photography. Therefore, in most cases, it is wiser to buy one of these professional-standard instruments instead of wasting money on fast reflector astrographs, which usually cannot produce the same pinpoint stars and jet-black backgrounds. One has only to compare the superior photographic images produced by Takahashi refractors with images obtainable even from astrographs of much larger apertures!

Click the images below to view them in greater detail and size
NGC-3372 taken by J.Finis 
Jim Finis, NGC-3372, TOA-130NS
M42 taken by W.Norrie with TSA-102 f/5.9 Witch Head Nebula, by W.Norrie 
W.Norrie, M42, TSA-102 at f/5.9 w/reducer & flattener W.Norrie, Witch Head Nebula, TSA-102 f/5.9 
NGC6357 taken with TSA-102 Eta Carinae
W.Norrie, NGC6357, TSA-102 f/5.9 W.Norrie, Eta Carinae, TSA-102 f/5.9
M31 WitchHead Nebula
P.Perkins, Galaxy M31, FSQ-106ED P.Perkins, Witch Head Nebula, FSQ-106ED
D..Stanicic FS-60CB Astrophoto  Segull Nebula 
D. Stanicic, FS-60CB P.Perkins, Seagull Nebula - IC2177 NGC2327, FSQ-106ED
Dave Stanicic - TOA130 Astrophotograph  
D.Stanicic, Eta Carinae, TOA-130 Veil Nebula, FS-60CB
This image was taken with the old model TOA-130 5" APO Refractor. You could just imagine what results you could get with the new improved TOA-130NS. Obviously you do not need a 10" instrument to obtain photos like this! This great image of the Veil Nebula shows you what even the smallest Takahashi refractor, the FS-60CB, is capable of when used as an astrograph. Further proof that you do not necessarily need larger apertures to take great images!
 
Higher Optical Quality beats Aperture Size every time!
 
Were these images taken with an 8" or 10" Astrograph ?
NO! These images were actually taken with TAKAHASHI's 'baby' astrograph, the FSQ-85EDX
Rosetter Nebula NGC 2377 - Merv Milward (25/1/2012) M45 - taken with FSQ-85EDX  Horse Head Nebulae
Rosette Nebula Pleides "Seven Sisters" Flame Nebula & Horse Head Nebula
These pictures of the Rosette Nebula (NGC2377), The Pleiades (M45), and the Flame Nebula (NGC2024) / Horse Head Nebula were taken by Merv Millward from Tasmania. Merv is the proud owner of a TAKAHASHI FSQ-85EDX, used here without a focal reducer, and mounted on the very stable and accurate TAKAHASHI EM-200 Temma-2M.
 
When it comes to astro-photography, TAKAHASHI refractors have no rivals!
 
For some examples of the fantastic images that are possible with the FSQ-106EDX3, please visit the website of master astro-photographer Rogelio Bernal Andreo 
 
Contact AEC for more information 

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